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W H A T ' S   N E W
November 2006

Review the Highlights From the Various Topics Listed Below
Amusement Parks APA Community APA Film APA Music APA Theater APA TV Astronomy Award Shows Business Christianity
Community Dance Diversity Ent. Biz Film Gambling Hollywood Hollywood History Literature Music
New Media Online Online Gaming Online Media Politics Sports Television Theater Travel  
 
Featured Artists                            R.I.P.                                         Editorials
 
WATCHING THE WORLD
     
 

EDITORIALS

ASIAN AMERICAN EXPERIENCE
Many of the conflicts within the Asian American community arise out of intergenerational disputes and cultural clashes as a result of social construction of "other." The westernization and exploitation of second generation Asian Americans contribute to the break down of traditional values. Intrafamilial conflict is among the most devastating to the Asian American social structure. An understanding of the values placed on relationships (Guanxi) is imperative in analyzing the impact of western exploitation.
For more info, click
HERE

FEATURED ARTISTS

APA COMMUNITY

APA FILM

THEATER

APA THEATER

APA MUSIC

APA TELEVISION

DIVERSITY

SPORTS

POLITICS

COMMUNITY

FILM

HOLLYWOOD HISTORY

HOLLYWOOD

ENTERTAINMENT BUSINESS

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BUSINESS

NEW MEDIA

ONLINE MEDIA

ONLINE

ONLINE GAMING

LITERATURE

CHRISTIANITY

AWARD SHOWS

ASTRONOMY

AMUSEMENT PARKS

ASIA

INDONESIA

SINGAPORE

JAPAN

SOUTH KOREA

CHINA

VIETNAM

PAKISTAN

INDIA

MACAO

THAILAND

TAIWAN

NORTH KOREA

R.I.P.

     

APA & MEDIA NEWS
BAAYORK LEE, YUKA TAKARA & PAUL TAM IN "CHORUS LINE"
This sturdy revival of "A Chorus Line" has everything going for it except the excitement of discovery, since it's pretty much the same show that opened on Broadway in 1975.
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

VILLARAIGOSA'S APA MEMBERS ON ASIA TRIP
Villaraigosa's team of 50+ people who traveled with him on his 16-day tour through China, South Korea and Japan included Donald Tang, Christopher Pak, Ki Suh Park, Peter Woo, Bill Watanabe and Irene Hirano
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

ORVILLE SCHELL HEAD ASIA SOCIETY
Orville Schell, a journalist and author who is one of the nation's top China experts, has been appointed director of the Asia Society's newly established Center on U.S.-China Relations,
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

SPEAKING OUT - JOHN CHO
For me, I choose not to take a lot of Asian roles because of the way they're written, and I end up playing roles that were originally not written Asian. . . . I think you have to be willing to say no and not get the role changed. . . .if we want change, we have to take responsibility for our part as minority actors.
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

LELAND WONG - CASE TURNING SALACIOUS
While receiving bribes from a company seeking a new port contract, former Hahn administration power broker alledgedly Leland Wong repeatedly sought to influence then-Deputy Mayor Troy Edwards by treating him to massages that included sexual favors.
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

USC EMMANUEL MOODY'S GUIDING UNCLE - MICHAEL CHANG
Michael Chang grew up as the only Asian kid in a tough neighborhood. His father died of a stroke when he was young and ended up living with his sister, Young Sun & her 3 kids that were abandoned by her black husband Eugene Moody. Since he was 14, he took it upon himself to serve as her sister's youngest son's (Emmanuel Moody) father figure. He applied equal measures of empathy and firmness - along with toughness with an emphasis on Christianity.
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

YOUNG JEAN LEE'S "SONGS OF A DRAGON"
Songs of the Dragons Flying to Heaven is a mildly amusing, but ultimately pointless, meditation on race and racism in America that was written and directed by Korean-American playwright Young Jean Lee. It's a loose framework cobbled together by chaos and overrun by nonsensical ideas.
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

CONDO COMPLEX IN ALHAMBRA W/ASIAN INVESTORS
The (San Gabriel) valley's attractiveness to people of Asian heritage, including many with roots in China or Taiwan just evolved over several decades. The (new housing) development in part reflects the growing influx of Asian money and immigrants into the valley, which is running out of land for new development.
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

KEANU REEVES NARRATES IN "THE GREAT WARMING"
Narrated by Alanis Morissette and Keanu Reeves, The Great Warming is a dramatic film about climate change that sweeps around the world to reveal how a changing climate is affecting the lives of people everywhere. It has been called "the best film about global warming ever shot."
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

MELSON BACOS IS SENTENCED
Filipino American and Petty Officer 3rd Class Melson Bacos was sentenced Friday to one year in the brig after he pleaded guilty to conspiracy and kidnapping in the death of an Iraqi man and agreed to testify against seven Marines charged with murder.
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

COUNTDOWN TO 300 MILLION
It should come as no surprise that the once liberal baby boomers — who now constitute the core of middle-aged middle America — should be resistant to the country's new younger generation, increasingly made up of first- and second-generation Latin Americans and Asians.
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

ARTESIA - DAIRIES TO "LITTLE INDIA"
Once a Portuguese-run dairy village, Artesia is now home to Southern California's largest Indian enclave. In the cultural and commercial district informally known as Little India, Hindi supplants English, saris are a wardrobe staple and fast food means samosas.
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

TIGER WOODS' PROJECT A SUCCESS
Golf icon and Western High School grad Tiger Woods made an Orange County stop on Saturday to raise money for his new learning center in Anaheim. He said the center has become in eight months a fun, vibrant, tight-knit community where kids can't wait to walk through the doors.
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

STARTING SUCCESSFUL HOME-BASED BUSINESSES
If you want to start a home business, ignore the home-business opportunity ads; there are no shortcuts to starting a successful home-based business. By following six steps, you'll end up with an idea for a home-based business that truly has the potential to succeed, bringing you the money and the satisfaction you've been dreaming of.
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

VICTOR SIM MAKING SUCCESSFUL NOODLES
Since 1974, Union Foods - the Irvine company - has been making such packets, which take three minutes to turn boiling water into a primary food group for college students. But high costs and other problems sent Union Foods on its own steep plunge in recent years.
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

KA LIQUOR OWNER AFRAID OF STREET GANGS
But in a neighborhood where street gangs cast a large shadow, the crackdown brought more anxiety than relief for the liquor store (Korean American) owner and his customers. "They (Korean American liquor store owners) found a solution to their problem, they found these guys, got photos and did their own investigation," Grace Yoo, executive director of the Korean American Coalition, said of the owner and his family. "But now that they've done it, they're in fear of their lives."
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

DAVID KUO'S "TEMPTING FAITH"
David Kuo, who was the number two guy at the Office of Faith Based initiatives in the White House writes a scathing account of how the administration used Christians to grab and maintain power. Read his interview with Newsweek's Richard Wolfe by clicking HERE.
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

CHO-LIANG LIN'S LEONARD BERNSTEIN INTEPRETATIONS
David Kuo, who was the number two guy at the Office of Faith Based initiatives in the White House writes a scathing account of how the administration used Christians to grab and maintain power.
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

IRIS YAMASHITA / "LETTERS FROM IWO JIMA"
Clint Eastwood/Paul Haggis tapped Iris Yamashita, a novice who had come to Haggis' attention through Creative Artists Agency's Cathy Tarr. "I had absolutely no knowledge of the battle of Iwo Jima before my agent contacted me about this project," says Yamashita, a second-generation Japanese American with conversational knowledge of Japanese. "To prepare for the meetings I read a lot of books, watched a couple of History Channel segments, and rented 'The Sands of Iwo Jima' with John Wayne. I had also done a lot of research on Japan for my screenplay 'Traveler in Tokyo,' which is set on the eve of World War II."
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

INDIAN-BORN MODEL/ACTRESS PADMA LAKSHMI - "TOP CHEF" HOST
Padma Lakshmi had a confession to make. "I hate reality TV, I have to tell you," said the new host of "Top Chef," Bravo's reality cooking competition. "I think a lot of it brings out the worst common denominator of the human spirit." But the Indian-born model and actress, perhaps best known for being married to Salman Rushdie, is satisfied that Season 2 of "Top Chef" won't contribute to the decline of modern culture. The reality series pits 15 up-and-coming chefs against one another in an intense culinary contest.
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

REVIEW: JEFF ADACHI'S "THE SLANTED SCREEN"
Objective data and more sound bites from others besides male Asian Americans might have helped make the case. It's ironic to talk about needing more participants who are not Asian American men, but this well-researched film's influence can only increase as it reaches beyond that circle — to those who never thought there was a problem. (Read an interview with Jeff Adachi by clicking HERE.
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

YOSHIHIRO TATSUMI'S "ABANDON THE OLD IN TOKYO"
Born in Osaka, Yoshihiro Tatsumi grew up in depressed and desolate postwar Japan, and started working in comics while still a teenager in the early 1950s. He coined the term gekiga, literally meaning "dramatic pictures," to distinguish the stark and realistic work he published throughout the 1960s and 1970s from the more commercial aesthetic of manga. "Abandon the Old in Tokyo," edited and designed by graphic novelist Adrian Tomine, is the second collection of Tatsumi gekiga to find its way into English.
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

MUHAMMAD YUNUS WINS NOBEL PEACE PRIZE
Muhammad Yunus, Bangladesh's "Banker to the Poor" who provided loans to help millions of people fight poverty by starting businesses, has won the Nobel Peace Prize.
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

DAVID KIM BUYS WENDY'S BAJA FRESH
The group purchasing Baja Fresh is a consortium of investment groups based on the West Coast lead by David Kim. The group already has several national brands, including Sweet Factory, Cinnabon, KaBloom and Denny's.
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

MICHELLE WIE
The LPGA's most recognizable player, Michelle Wie, isn't really a member of the LPGA Tour and doesn't want to be. Because she's not a member of the LPGA — Wie turned 17 Wednesday — she is not eligible to play the 32-player, limited-field, $1.55-million ADT Championship next month and neither does she have a place on the official LPGA money list. But Wie as the face of the LPGA is an unusual situation, because she's not a member of the LPGA and she doesn't play at many LPGA tournaments. Where you do see Wie, of course, are places such as the rue de la Paix in Paris, on a huge billboard inside the front window at the store for Omega, one of the sponsors that have helped make her a millionaire while still in high school.
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

KEN TAN - AMERICA'S BEST "STILL RINGS" GYMNAST
Halfway through his routine, America's best gymnast on the still rings was in such bad shape, his coach had to run onto the podium to catch him in case he fell. And indeed, Kevin Tan finished the set on his backside. Tan had an out: He came down with food poisoning when he got to Denmark last week and wasn't anywhere near full strength for what was supposed to be one of the U.S. team's best routines of the day.
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

INDIAN AMERICAN SIMONE SHAH'S EFFORTS TO TEACH
Sure it seems odd to be eating spicy chicken wings and discussing Aristotle with a young Muslim who thinks she's on the U.S. government's terrorist watch list, especially while hanging out with a bunch of high school teachers at Hooters. But then everything about Simone Shah's almost yearlong effort to return to teaching in Los Angeles has had a "Through the Looking Glass" quality.
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

EHREN WATADA
Watada, 28, is an Army first lieutenant who earlier this year became the first commissioned officer to refuse deployment to Iraq, calling the war illegal and immoral. Although other soldiers have refused deployment, his status as an officer sets his case apart. The Honolulu native of Japanese and Chinese descent faces a general court-martial and up to seven years in prison for charges involving his refusal to deploy, criticism of President Bush and "conduct unbecoming an officer."
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

MING HSIEH'S $35M DONATION TO USC
Cogent Inc.'s CEO Ming Hsieh made a $35-million gift to USC's electrical engineering department. The donation is part of a $300-million fundraising campaign by USC's engineering school intended to propel it to the top tier of engineering schools, with such institutions as Caltech, MIT, Stanford and UC Berkeley.
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

ADELINE YEN MAH'S RETREAT FOR WRITERS
E.L. Doctorow said that all he needed to write was a blank wall. Eudora Welty created all of her fiction in her family home. Andrew Winer has found that he prefers the foreign silence and solitude of someone else's house to get the job done ¡ª a fact he has discovered as the first person to be invited by author Adeline Yen Mah and her husband, Bob, to use their weekend residence in Laguna Beach as a writer's retreat. No cost, no interruptions, no time limit.
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

EARTHQUAKE IN HAWAII
Resorts, airports and much else about Hawaiian life were back to normal Tuesday, two days after a magnitude-6.7 earthquake struck just off the island of Hawaii. But for some of the Big Island's most historic — and fragile — structures (Hulihe'e Palace), etc.), the effects of the quake were not so quickly overcome.
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

APA COMMUNITIES IN NEVADA
This is now a reality in the State of Nevada especially in Southern Nevada, and one could see the evidence of the emergence of this (Asian Pacific American) community when those who run this State endeavor to have inroads in to this community to establish contacts and especially to win their support in an election year.
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

LYRICS BORN
"As I got older, I started to realize that the criteria for me for what a good record is just started to change," he says. "Being the best rapper doesn't necessarily mean that you write the best songs. I don't want to be a watered-down MC, you know, and just write catchy songs that hopefully everybody's going to like. I still want to be a good rapper." In a genre where credibility is often more important than talent, it's a fine line.
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

RINKO KIKUCHI INTERVIEW
Few outside of Japan may have heard of the beautiful Rinko Kikuchi, but those of us who have already seen Babel, are already raving about the actress's extraordinary and brave performance as a deaf teenager dealing with your budding sexuality, guilt of your mother's suicide and the pangs of feeling an outsider in contemporary Japan, in one of the powerful storylines of the powerful film by director Alejandro González Iñárritu, which stars Brad Pitt and Cate Blanchett.
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

INDISPENSIBLE & DISPOSABLE CHINESE (1871)
Here were men who would do the drudgery of life at a reasonable wage when every other man had but one idea—to work at the mines for gold. Here were cooks, laundrymen, and servants ready and willing. Just what early California civilization most wanted these men could and would supply. . . . . The Chinaman was welcomed as long as the surface gold was plentiful . . . But that happy situation was not long to continue. . . . (Click HERE to read about how this situation was handled) Various schemes were proposed for ridding the country of the Chinese as if they were a pest. . . . In connection with a violent race hatred, it kept the state in turmoil for the first thirty years of its existence.
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

GEE JON - 1ST EXECUTION BY LETHAL GAS IN 1924
Gee Jon was the first person in the United States to be executed by lethal gas. He was executed at the Nevada State Prison on February 8, 1924 for the crime of murder. Gee, along with Hughie Sing were convicted for killing Tom Quong Kee in Mina, Nevada on August 27, 1921.
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

CHRISTIAN HOSOI (CHRIST-AIR/CHRIST FAITH)
In the 1980s' hey-day of the skateboarding world, one skater literally rose above the rest — Christian Hosoi. His name became synonymous with big air and big stunts. One stunt in particular, known as the Christ Air, required the skateboarder — while flying vertically in the air — to grab his board in one hand and spread his arm and straighten his legs. The resulting posture looks like Christ on the cross. The skater who revolutionized the sport and inspired generations now hopes to do it again — this time in the name of the real Christ. In Hosoi's words, he wants "to touch this generation in a relevant way for Jesus."
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

APA POLITICAL STRENGTH
It is not only the numerical strength that brings the Asians to the middle of the picture but also their well recognized commitment to the universal franchise, their higher educational and professional level and most importantly the rapport and the close dialogue the leaders of each of these Asian associations maintain with those who are `power to be reckoned with' in this fast growing Western state of Nevada and, significantly, the close inter-connections these Asian associations maintain with each other that project their importance.
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

CHINESE COMMUNITIES IN IRVINE
Attracted by good schools, low crime and well-paying jobs, Irvine has become a destination for Asian American professionals, especially Chinese Americans. It's home to one of the country's biggest Chinese language schools, the largest Buddhist temple and monastery in Orange County, a Chinese orchestra and clubs for artists, students and senior citizens. More Chinese Americans live in Irvine than any other city in the county.
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

WHY DID FOUR KOREAN FATHERS COMMITTED SUICIDE
All across Los Angeles during that cold week in early spring, the questions were asked again and again. Why had these (Korean) fathers - Dae Kwon Yun, Bong Joo Lee, Sang Kim & Matthew Kim - killed their children? Had they gone mad? Were the crimes simply a terrible coincidence? Or were they evidence of some deeper malaise afflicting the city's Korean American immigrants?
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

BIN NA KIM - STRENGTH & LOVE OUT OF TRAGEDY
Her father shot them all, the detectives told her. He shot her too. Days passed. The people kept coming. They prayed for her. Cried for her. While she slept, they whispered: We love you. You are strong. You will get better. Through most of it, Bin Na remained numb. She still had not cried or mourned her family. She still had not prayed. She felt empty. Maybe it was the painkillers, she thought. Or maybe it was because she did not want to feel.
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

JAMES WAN'S "SAW 3" (LEIGH WHANNELL)
"Saw III" was directed by Darren Lynn Bousman, who also helmed the second film, from a story by franchise originators Leigh Whannell and James Wan and screenplay by Whannell. The first "Saw," which cost about $1.2 million to make, opened at $18.3 million in the U.S. and Canada and ended up grossing $102.9 million worldwide. Right after its opening, Lions Gate greenlighted "Saw II," a $4-million production that generated worldwide ticket sales of $144.1 million a year later.
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

JAPANESE TYCOON'S VISION OF LOW-COST RENTS
Japanese billionaire Gensiro Kawamoto raised plenty of eyebrows — and hackles — when he announced vague plans to rent several of his 18 posh Kahala properties to low-income "native Hawaiians" only. "I'd like to honor what native Hawaiians say, that this used to be their land," Kawamoto explained, noting that there were very few native Hawaiians among the swells living in Kahala, a neighborhood of high gates and stucco mansions. "We should honor their land."
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

YOYO MA & NATHANIEL AYERS
Thirty-five years ago, he and (Yoyo) Ma were young talents whose paths crossed briefly, when neither could have imagined the life that awaited. The story begins Feb. 4, 1970, when Ayers, a restless 19-year-old, filled out and sent an application to the Juilliard School. Ayers was offered a full scholarship. Yo-Yo Ma. For a brief time, they played in the same Juilliard orchestra, although Ayers didn't think of Ma as a peer. Ma, though four years younger, was way out there on his own, a jaw-dropping talent. Classmates began to notice increasingly hostile and strange behavior from him, and some grew tired of his tirades about racist white America. In reality, it was the beginning of a breakdown. One night, he started speaking incoherently and took off his clothes in the apartment of a classmate. The friend called the police, and Ayers was taken by ambulance to Bellevue Hospital. Soon after, he left Juilliard for good. In the 33 years since then, many of them spent living on the streets of Cleveland an Los Angeles, Ayers has often wondered about his former classmates, holding onto a connection to them through the music he continued playing. Ma reached around Mr. Ayers and pulled him close (when Nathaniel attended his concert). "I just want to tell you," Ma said through a bear hug, "what it means to meet you. To meet somebody who really, really loves music. We're brothers."
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

RINKO KIKUCHI SPEAKS "UNVERSAL LANGUAGE OF BABEL"
Since "Babel" premiered at Cannes last spring, Kikuchi's ability to convey the ordinary and extraordinary nature of her character has drawn acclaim. Chieko's extensive use of sign language in almost every scene demanded mastery of the skill, which Kikuchi taught herself over the course of the full year she spent auditioning for the part.
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

MASI OKA IS THE LATEST "HERO"
Hiro Nakamura, the gleeful comic book geek who uttered the coolest lines in TV this fall — "Save the cheerleader, save the world" — is captivating audiences in true superhero fashion. With his childlike awe, indefatigable joy and amusing vocabulary slip-ups, Hiro — played by the equally jolly Masi Oka on NBC's "Heroes" — is the first male character to break out this TV season.
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

FREIDA LEE MOCK - WRESTLI NG WITH KUSHNER
Mock, who won an Oscar for a previous documentary on Vietnam Veterans Memorial architect Maya Lin (Maya Lin: A Strong Clear Vision) tells Liane Hansen (NPR Reporter) how she came to pick Kushner as a documentary subject, and what it was like to spend so much time in his world.
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

MR. CONGENIALITY - YOYO MA
Yo-Yo Ma is the world's most popular cellist. That is not to say that he is the world's finest cellist. . . . But no one can doubt this cellist's rare mastery of his instrument, his genuine connection with audiences, his vast versatility. He is the world's most convivial cellist.
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

US HALLYU - KA ROLES SEEN IN AMERICAN TV
As Korean dramas and movies spread like wildfire in Asia, a different form of `hallyu' or Korean Wave seems to be taking place in the U.S. Hollywood appears to be catching on to the so-called Korean Wave, as Korean-American and Korean characters are popping up in some top-rating U.S. TV shows (i.e. Grey's Anatomy's Christina Yang, Gilmore Girs' Lane Kim and Lost's Sun/Jin) and movies.
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

OSCAR CAMPAIGN FOR GONG LI AS "BEST ACTRESS"
Sony Pictures Classics is so impressed with the final cut of "Curse of the Golden Flower" that the studio has officially decided to launch a Oscar best-actress campaign for Gong Li and to promote Zhang Yimou for best director.
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

AFI FILM FEST'S ASIAN SELECTIONS
"The Curse of the Golden Flower" is just one of several strong Asian entries, which include "Memories of Tomorrow," executive produced by and starring "Last Samurai's" Ken Watanabe as a businessman suffering early-onset Alzheimer's, and the horror film "The Host," currently a sensation in Asia.
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

BONG JOON-HO'S "THE HOST"
Bong (Joon-ho) based his movie ("The Host") on the true story of a 2000 scandal in which Albert McFarland, an American civilian running the morgue at the U.S. military base in Seoul, ordered Korean employees to dump embalming waste down a drain. The fluid was chemically treated but still ended up in the Han River. McFarland ended up in the headlines and a Korean court, where he was given a two-year suspended sentence.
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

DANGER IN KOREATOWN
To the casual eye, Koreatown is thriving — with luxury condominiums and extravagant nightclubs rising from the destruction of the riots. During his Asian trade mission earlier this month, Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa announced $300 million in South Korean investment in Koreatown . . . But behind the glitz, anxiety is building. A series of high-profile slayings in the community over the last year — including the shooting deaths of three people at a Koreatown restaurant earlier this month — have heightened concerns about crime.
Click Here to Read More>>>>>

C.Y. LEE - AUTHOR OF THE BOOK "FLOWER DRUM SONG" IS BASED ON
C.Y. Lee, born in Hunan, China, received a B.A. degree from Southwest Associated University, Kunming, China, and an M.F.A. with a major in playwriting from Yale University. Before his Amerproican education, Lee worked during World War II as Secretary to the Sawba of Mangshih, a small principality on the China-Burma border. The experience resulted in a series of articles published in the New Yorker magazine and, later, a book entitled The Sawba and his Secretary (British edition: A Corner of Heaven). A television series based on the book was made and aired in Taiwan.

Lee wrote his first novel, The Flower Drum Song, in San Francisco while he was city editor of a Chinese language newspaper in Chinatown. The book was a New York Times best-seller; as FLOWER DRUM SONG it subsequently became a Rodgers and Hammerstein Broadway musical and a Universal film.

UPCOMING EVENTS
Texas Asian Chamber of Commerce will celebrate the past, present and future achievements of the Asian Pacific Americans in Media and Culture February 24, 2007 in Austin Texas. The past will be celebrated by honoring C.Y. Lee's "Flower Drum Song,", the present by Jodi Long (who will be performing)/Suzanne Whang (who will be the event's emcee) on-going work and the future by the appearance of Di Quon from "My Life - Disoriented" that was directed by Eric Byler. Dan Nainan, a working Indian/Japanese comedian will also be performing. Tickets can be purchased online at www.txasianchamber.org or by phone to 512-420-8777.

FuSion 2007 - a two-night Lunar New Year events at the Aladdin/Planet Hollywood Resort & Casino on February 13th & 14th. The first night will include Jackie Chan, A-mei, Mayday, Shin Band, Zhang Zhen Yue and Supergirls - top performers from China’s hit version of “American Idol.” The second night's lineup include Kanye West, Gnarls Barkley, rapper Lupe Fiasco; hip-hop group Spank Rock, Berka, Tigra and mash-up DJ Girl Talk. Both concerts will be televised on China’s Hunan television network. For more concert information, please visit www.fusionyearoftheboar.com. To purchase tickets, call the Aladdin Box Office at 1 (877) 333-9474 or Ticketmaster at (702) 474-4000.

Jodi Long

A native New Yorker, Jodi made her Broadway debut at age 7 in Nowhere to Go But Up directed by Sidney Lumet. Other Broadway credits include Loose Ends with Kevin Kline, The Bacchae with Irene Pappas, Sondheim/Furth’s Getting Away with Murder, and most recently as Madame Liang in the revival of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Flower Drum Song written by David Henry Hwang.

For the same performance at The Mark Taper in Los Angeles she won The Ovation Award for Best Supporting Actress in a Musical. Off- Broadway: Roundabout Theater; McReele. Lincoln Center; Wendy Wasserstein’s Old Money. Public Theater; David Hwang’s Golden Child and Family Devotions. Manhattan Theater Club; Chay Yew’s Red and Phillip Gotanda’s The Wash. LaMama; The Tooth of Crime. Regional credits include The Mark Taper, Long Wharf, Arena Stage, Actor’s Theater, South Coast Repertory, in parts ranging from Titania in A Midsummer Night’s Dream, (Pittsburgh Public), Cherie in Bus Stop, (River Arts), to Marina in Mark Lamos’s Pericles, (Hartford Stage). Jodi was “M” in Philip Glass/David Hwang’s world tour of 1,000 Airplanes on the Roof, a 90 min. monologue.

As the lead singer in The Asian American Art Ensemble, she released a jazz album, Bamboo That Snaps Back. Television audiences know Jodi as series regulars Mme. Ybarra in Café Americain, Margaret Cho’s Mom in All American Girl, David Caruso’s assistant in Michael Hayes, and most recently as Alicia Silverstone’s secretary in NBC’s Miss Match. Film credits include Paul Schrader’s Patty Hearst, Mike Newell’s Sour Sweet, Striking Distance, The Pickle, and The Hot Chick.

Jodi was recently honored by the Chinese Historical Society of Southern California for her contribution to the visibility of Chinese Americans as an actress. She is also the recipient of the Los Angeles Woman’s Theater’s Maverick Award 2000, The Titan Theater of New York ’s Earthshaker Award 2001 and Pan Asian Rep’s 2001 Award, all for her work in the theater.

C.Y. Lee is the author of nine novels and two non-fiction books published in English and many European and Asian languages. His works include Lover's Point, The Sawba and His Secretary, Madame Goldenflower, The Virgin Market, Land of the Golden Mountain, Days of the Tong Wars, China Saga, Gate of Rage, Second Son of Heaven and others. Besides writing books, short stories and articles, Lee also worked with David Brown in 1960 as a script writer for 20th Century Fox studios.

He is the recipient of a California Commonwealth Club Gold Medal Fiction Award, a San Francisco Press Club and Union League Annual Award, a Writers' Guild Annual Award for Writing Achievement and a Box Office Blue Ribbon Award. He has received the key to the City of San Francisco.

A member of the Authors' League and Dramatists' Guild of America, a C.Y. Lee archive has been established at Boston University's Mugar Memorial Library. The annual C.Y. Lee Creative Writing Contest for the encouragement of Asian American literature and scholarship has been established at Cal State L.A.

SUZANNE WHANG - Actor/Comedian/Host/Author

Suzanne Whang is an actor, television host, stand-up comedian, author, public speaker, dessert topping, and floor wax - along being a graduate of Yale University with a B.A. in Psychology, and holds a Master's Degree in Cognitive Psychology from Brown University.
(More on her secrets can be found at
www.thesecret.tv) As an actor, Suzanne has appeared in numerous television series, including a hilarious recurring role as Polly the oversexed spa manager on Las Vegas, a memorable guest starring role as the young Mrs. Lee on Cold Case, and co-starring roles on Two & a Half Men, Boston Legal, Still Standing, Criminal Minds, Nip/Tuck, The Practice, Strong Medicine, Robbery Homicide Division, Norm, and NYPD Blue.

She appears in the Keanu Reeves feature film Constantine as a screaming mother whose daughter is possessed by soldier demons, cameo appearance in the Hilary Duff feature, Material Girls. Suzanne is a graduate of the acting program at the William Esper Studio in New York City, and also studied with Milton Katselas, Richard Lawson, Gary Imhoff and Jeffrey Tambor at the Beverly Hills Playhouse.

As a host, she is currently in her fifth season of hosting House Hunters, the #1 rated show on HGTV (Home & Garden Television Network), and she also hosts the new hit spin-off show, House Hunters International. She was the host in programs such as Homes of Our Heritage: Great American Women, Homes of Pasadena, Blitz Build 2000, Holiday Windows, and The Making of Rose Parade 2005 and 2006. She has co-hosted TV's Censored Bloopers for NBC (w/Dick Clark) and New Attitudes on Lifetime Television. Prior to that, she was a field host/fill-in co-host for FOX After Breakfast, and a field host for Breakfast Time, Personal FX, and The Pet Department on the FX cable network.

DI QUON (Producer of "My Life . . Disoriented")
Websites
My Life
MySpace Site
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Scene 2
Di Quon made her big screen debut as "Lily Kim" - hotel seamstress in, Maid In Manhattan starring Jennifer Lopez and directed by Wayne Wang. In the past, she has had recurring roles on Boston Public and Groundeded for life, Guest star roles on Medium and Campus Ladies, shot several pilots, including one for the WB in Barcelona, was in the feature film Pulse and the indie film Space and Time and numerous commercials.

In 2006, she produced and acted in her own TV pilot for PBS called My Life… Disoriented. My Life… Disoriented is the first ever Asian American Dramedy television pilot in the "High School Genre" that also starred Tamlyn Tomita, Karin Cheung, Dennis Dun and Autumn Reeser.

As an accomplished emcee, she has also been a red carpet host for An Evening at the Academy Awards on ABC, and she hosted the 20th Anniversary Gala Concert of the Korean Concert Society at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. She also emcees many charity events, including a Lupus Gala Charity Benefit and a Breast Cancer Awareness Charity Benefit. And Suzanne does humorous and inspirational public speaking gigs across the country, at high schools, universities, conventions, and whatever else floats her boat.

As a stand-up comedian, Suzanne won the First Annual ANDY KAUFMAN AWARD at the New York Comedy Festival. She also won Best Up & Coming Comedian at the Las Vegas Comedy Festival, playing her controversial, shocking, and politically incorrect alter-ego, SUNG HEE PARK. The act is a satire of racism in America, reminiscent of Archie Bunker's character in the phenomenal sitcom, All In The Family. Suzanne regularly performs one-week stints at the Improv in Las Vegas and Lake Tahoe. One can contact her through Ken Kragen at 310-854-4400.


 
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