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W H A T ' S   N E W
August 2005

Scan and Review the Highlights From the Various Categories Listed Below
  Anime APA Community Business Chinese Americans Christianity Diversity  
  Film Health Literature Live 8 Music Online Gaming  
  Online Technology R.I.P. Radio Supreme Court Television Theater, Comedy & Poetry  
 
Featured Artists                                                                   Editorials
 
     
 

EDITORIALS
CHINESE INFLUENCE IN THE 19TH CENTURY
The Chinese were not only forced to work for next to nothing - they proved to be extremely capable. "They are the mainstay of the orchardist," said the Pacific Rural Press, "The only supply of labor he can depend upon. They are pickers and packers of fruit. It is difficult to see how our annual fruit crop could be harvested and prepared for market without 'Chinaman'."

PAST CHINESE IMMIGRATION POLICIES

  • In 1800s - there was physical examinations,
  • the 1868 - Burlingame/Seward Treaty,
  • 1870's - Fifteem Passenger Bill,
  • the 1882 - Exclusion Act,
  • in 1888 - there was the Scott Act,
  • Hawaii passed a bill to limit Chinese immigration in 1888,
  • 1892's Geary Act,
  • in 1897 - U.S. vs. Wong Kim Ark limited family legislation,
  • 1922's Cable Act,
  • 1917's Alien Land Law,
  • the 1924 - Immigration Act,
  • in 1943 - Exclusion Acts were repealed,
  • 1945 - War Brides Act,
  • allowed American servicemen's wives to enter,
  • 1948's Displaced Persons Act and
  • 1956's Immigration Act.

    In 1978, the United States government set a single annual world quota of 290,000, and this ceiling was raised again in 1990 to 700,000. The Refugee Act of 1980 brought some order to admission of emigrants coming from Southeast Asia's war zone. During the 1990s, immigrants have arrived at a pace that at times have exceeded one million new arrivals per year, and have settled in all parts of the country. The Quota of Chinese in America:

    • 1979: Chinese has its own quota of 20,000
    • 1982: Taiwan awarded its own quota of 20,000
    • 1986: Hong Kong's quota expended to 5,000; legalization of aliens living in the United States before January 1,1982
    • 1993: New immigration laws addressed the increase of ships with Asian immigrants attempting to illegally enter American ports and by way of way of Mexico and Canada.

    CHINESE CHALLENGES AND DISCRIMINATION
    From the moment substantial numbers of Chinese immigrants first set foot on America soil in 1850. With Chinese people providing cheap labor. American people treated Chinese as servants and/or as a group of people who are really lower than they are in everything.

    Chinese get different treatment no matter who they are: as a laborer, different treatment from boss; as students, different treatment from teachers; as customers, different treatment from employees of restaurants, markets, shops, etc.; and as defendant or plaintiff, different treatment from Judge. Of course, not all the Chinese get treatment like this and not all the Americans treat Chinese like this, but bad treatment already became a big problem for Chinese.

    The Chinese saw that the source of their oppression was racism, for they were treated very differently from the European immigrants. Chinese immigrants were the most vulnerable target for all kinds of discrimination attacks, especially during bad economics times when incompetent politicians failed to provide and execute a solid economic plan.

    European immigrants had much more rights then immigrants from Asia. It happened not just because they were from Asia, but because their skin had different color. European immigrants got citizenship and voting rights often immediately after arrival in the United States. Immigrants with white skins did not remain as "strangers" in the way Asians did.

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    APA & MEDIA NEWS
    HIKARU UTADA AND MTV'S FLUX
    Superstar Hikaru Utada is being featured in what MTV claims is the world's first mobile phone-based music-video series comprising animated clips based on songs from Utada's 2004 English-language album, Exodus on MTV Networks' new Flux service, which it calls "the world's first mobile entertainment community."
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    DALPHNE KWOK HEAD "ANGEL ISLAND" FOUNDATION
    Angel Island Immigration Station Foundation (AIISF) has appointmented Daphne Kwok, nationally-known Asian/Pacific Islander American leader, as its new Executive Director.
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    WHY CHINESE IMMIGRATED
    The background about why Chinese immigrated to the United States was very complicated. The factors that made the Chinese to leave their homeland and to go to a place where they had never been before had changed as time went by. Chinese have been to the United States for a long, long time.
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    SHO YANO - CHILD PRODIGY
    Sho Yano was born in Portland, Oregon to a Korean mother and Japanese father. He was diagnosed as a prodigy with an IQ of more than 200 and begins medical school.
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    ANGEL ISLAND INTERROGATION
    The Chinese immigrants were often faced with unreasonable and lengthy interrogations while being detained on the island. The interrogation process was a frightening event for the detainees. During the interrogations, which would take one to two whole days to finish, Chinese immigrants were usually beginning to ask with very detailed and uneasy-to-answer questions.
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    CHINESE AMERICAN BUSINESSES
    Chinese immigrants had established businesses in the United States for a long time. The businesses were from very small, one-person operations to huge concerns with branches all over the world. The Chinese businesses changed greatly over the years and were influenced by economic events, by American reception of the Chinese and by world events.
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    CHINESE AMERICANS & COMPUTER INDUSTRY BUSINESSES
    Chinese Americans have contributed a lot to the development of computer industry in California. The Silicon Valley, Which is famous in computer industry, is formed by a large number of Chinese with technical skills in computer science. Wang An, Jerry Yang, and David Tsang are those who have succeeded in computer industry and have their own business in California.
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    CHINESE AMERICANS IN OTHER BUSINESSES
    The performance of the Chinese workers in the industries they entered shows conclusively that,given normal condition, they would quickly have emerged as a valuable part of the industrial working class of America. There are numerous testimonials to their skills, diligence, and discipline, but the American Federation of Labor unions refused to bring the Chinese workers into their organization. On the contrary, Samuel Gompers and his colleagues led the anti-Chinese chorus.
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    CHINESE AMERICANS SEEK EDUCATION
    Since the first group of Chinese set foot on America more than one hundred years ago, education of Chinese American developed from zero to that excellence of today. Many Chinese Americans contributed and keep on contributing to education of America. One hundred years ago, there almost were no schools for Chinese Americans. They didn't have right and chance to go to public school.
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    CHINESE MEDICINE
    Unlike science, Chinese medicine was not being cheered by the Americans at first. When the Chinese herbalists first came, they had a lot of problems. Americans thought Chinese medicine was useless. They joined together to suppress Chinese herbalists. Year by year, more and more people believed in Chinese herbs and medicine. By the later part of this century, acupuncture was introduced to the US. Now, more and more doctors are trying to get acupuncture license.
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    CHINESE IN POLITICS
    Fast-growing number of Chinese American politicians are making contributions in the USA. The political world in the USA is still dominated by white people - though that is changing.
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    CHANGING ASIAN FACES IN AMERICAN FILMS
    Charlie Chan, Fu Manchu, Long Duk Dong: The American film landscape is littered with speech-impaired, bucktooth stereotypes of Asian peoples. But the picture is getting brighter as young Asian-American filmmakers tweak the caricatures, cull from their own lives and create fleshed-out Asian characters.
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    "CROSSING EAST" RADIO PROGRAMS
    "Crossing East" is an eight-hour radio documentary produced for national distribution during Asian Heritage Month, May 2006. The program will rely on scholar and oral history interviews, professional actors reading historical documents as well as literature and original music by traditional Asian American musicians around the country.
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    MARC YU - CHILD PRODIGY ON PIANO
    "In Marc's case, he could be the next household-name pianist," said Jeffrey Bernstein, director of choral music at Occidental College and assistant conductor of the Pasadena Symphony.
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    RAIDS ON S. KOREAN BROTHELS
    Two criminal syndicates suspected of smuggling hundreds of South Korean women into the United States to work at brothels in the Los Angeles and San Francisco areas have been broken up with the arrest of 45 people, including the ringleaders.
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    TIM BURTON'S BOLLYWOOD INFLUENCES
    "But Tim (Burton) was, 'No! When you're watching the Bollywood musicals, one song is a ballad, one is a rock song, you get each song not knowing where they're going to be coming from.' "
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    PLIGHT AND FALL OF THE FILM INDUSTRY
    73% of adults prefer watching movies at home, according to an Associated Press-AOL poll. A quarter of those polled said they had not been to a theater in the last year. Compared with last year, box-office receipts have been down every weekend since late February; the last time comparable business was off for such a long span was in 1985.
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    KIMS OF COMEDY
    "The Asian comedy market is one that has never really been tapped," says Steve Byrne, lounging in the green room of the Punch Line Comedy Club. "I mean, even animals have their own planet!"
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    MINIDOKA INTERNMENT MONUMENT
    Hoping to give modern-day visitors a glimpse of life at a World War II internment camp in this rural farming community, the National Park Service is proposing to recreate a block of barracks like those that housed the 13,000 Japanese-Americans detained at the compound between 1942 and 1945.
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    TOURISM AND DIVERSITY
    The new American-history-lesson car trip may include a place like Manzanar, a former Japanese-American internment camp in Independence, Calif., or Angel Island Immigration Station Barracks in San Francisco Bay - for the Chinese, the Ellis Island of the West. (Discount rates can be found at ExpertFlyer.Com)
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    ASIAN YOUTHS AS ENTREPENEURS
    Synovate's newest survey conducted in collaboration with MSN, MTV and Yahoo!, reveals that Asian youth are more interested in becoming an entrepreneur as they near age 15, in addition to 19% reporting the a secure job is their first concern and 16% worry about financial stability.
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    CHAN ACCUSES TUCKER AS BEING A DIVA
    Jackie Chan has accused his Rush Hour costar Chris Tucker of blocking production of a new installment of the franchise by making a power grab. "He wants final editing rights and the final look at the movie and so on," Chan told The Associated Press.
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    INCREASED MULTICULTURAL AD REQUESTS
    The website saw a 64% increase in ad and marketing communication searches for agencies that center on the multicultural marketing market within a 3 month period alone (August 1-October 31, 2004 vs. May 1-July 31, 2004).
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    REACHING APA CONSUMERS
    Korean and Chinese TV are the most popular for the ethnic Asian American media consumers with 25% as primary consumers. Asian Americans look to read their ethnic newspapers with nearly 80% of the Chinese, Korean and Vietnamese adults perusing one regularly.
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    WENDI MURDOCH & JULIE MOONVES
    Wendi Deng Murdoch and Julie Chen Moonves were part of Billionaire Investment Banker Herbert Allen's Annual Media and Technology Conference.
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    BMI GAUGE TEST (BODY FAT) INACCURATE
    Even when waist size and waist-to-hip ratios were considered, the study found that many in the Asian, Chinese and Aboriginal groups who had "healthy" BMI levels were at high risk of weight-related health problems and didn't know it.
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    SUCCESS OF CHINA INC.
    China's most successful acquisitions to date in the U.S. have little to do with China's low- cost money and workers or buying our brands. They are instead all about Chinese management skill and U.S. workers. These no-name Chinese acquisitions are turn-arounds founded on hard-nosed Chinese business practices, and they import less product from China than most U.S. manufacturers do.
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    BAI LING - FROM CHINA TO PLAYBOY
    "Bai Ling Naked" screams the headline, and there she is -- in a bizarre outfit of skimpy leather straps that leaves you wanting more (or is it less?) -- the first Asian-born actress to grace the cover of Playboy magazine. She's come a long way since Tiananmen Square.
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    STACEYANN CHIN - SLAM POET
    A part-Black, part-Chinese lesbian immigrant from Jamaica, Staceyann Chin finds poetry in belonging everywhere and no place in particular. "The gay-lesbian community is so white here. I am in the black community, but I am queer. I have a foot in the Asian community."
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    SLOW PROCESS OF DIVERSITY IN NEWSROOMS
    UNITY: Journalists of Color survey showed that employment of people of color in local television broadcast newsrooms declined from 21.8 percent in 2003 to 21.2 percent in 2004. Journalists of color working in local radio also experienced a decline from 11.8 percent to 7.9 percent. The percentage of people of color at English-language television stations also dropped from 19.8 percent to 19.5 percent.
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    JET LI WANTS TO INSPIRE YOUTHS
    Jet Li says the high number of suicides in China prompted him to make his new movie about kung-fu master Huo Yuanjia, saying he wants to inspire youngsters to live life to the fullest like Huo did.
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    GUS LEE'S "TIGER'S TAIL"
    While reading Gus Lee's third and latest novel, Tiger's Tail, I asked myself, not for the first time, what we mean when we say someone is "a typical American." Since we're all together in this crazy American pastiche--a cultural experiment that can best be likened to a salmagundi, owing to its colorful, flavorful ingredients--it occurred to me that Lee and the multiethnic cast of characters he has thrown together in this semiautobiographical tale are indeed typical Americans.
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    SCHIZOPHRENIA & RACE
    Although schizophrenia has been shown to affect all ethnic groups at the same rate, the scientist found that blacks in the United States were more than four times as likely to be diagnosed with the disorder as whites. Hispanics were more than three times as likely to be diagnosed as whites.
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    PSYCHOLOGY AND RACE
    This thing called psychiatry -- it is a European-American invention, and it largely has no respect for nonwhite philosophies of mental health and how people function. A lot of minority groups perceive psychiatric interventions as an ideological approach that discounts their own cultures.
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    JACKIE CHAN WANTS RISKIER ROLES
    Jackie Chan says he prefers making movies in Asia because he can try risky new genres on his home turf, while in Hollywood, he stars in action comedies that are more likely to be box office hits. Still, he aspires to the diversity of a Robert De Niro, and says it's the right thing to do artistically. "Should I make movies just for strong box-office numbers? Should I become enslaved by movies? I don't want to stay at the same spot," he said. "I hope every one of my films is different."
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    CHOU YUN-FAT'S NEW ROLE
    Hollywood star Chow Yun-Fat is making his first film in native Hong Kong in a decade, saying he would forgo a higher pay check in the U.S. because he liked the part and wanted to work with the director. "I agreed to this movie because I haven't worked with Ann in a long time. I admire her and Siqin Gaowa a lot. Plus the role I was offered in this movie is something new. I've never played a swindler before, so I want to try."
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    NATIVE HAWAIIANS SOVEREIGNTY
    Now, 112 years after United States troops helped overthrow the independent Kingdom of Hawaii and 12 years after Congress apologized for it, that Hawaiian distinctiveness appears close to being formally recognized by the United States government. A bill that for the first time would extend sovereignty to the native Hawaiian people is poised for a vote - and likely approval - in the United States Senate despite opposition from many Republicans who denounce the measure as unworkable and as promoting racial Balkanization.
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    CHINESE HOLOCAUST MUSEUM SEEK JAPAN'S APOLOGY
    The Bay Area's Chinese Holocaust Museum, Rape of Nanking Redress Coalition and Global Alliance for Preserving the Truth of the Sino-Japanese War want Japan to make amends for its actions before and during World War II.
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    JOAN CHEN - ELIZABETH TAYLOR OF CHINA
    She made the surprising revelation that she was actually on the short list to direct the movie (Memoirs of a Geisha) but lost out to Rob Marshall shortly before production began. Chen said that she does not mind playing such roles (exotic Asian female characters), "I'm comfortable being a woman. I have no problem being a `white man's fantasy'".
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    LUCY LIU INTERVIEW
    The first thing I noticed when meeting actress Lucy Liu on the set of the Ghost House movie Rise (other upcoming movies include Lucky Number Slevin w/Kingsley and Morgan Freeman, Charlie Chan project, Asian Brides, 3 Needles and Devil to Pay) is that she's just breathtakingly gorgeous in person, with a devilish grin and beguiling eyes that convey an uncommon wisdom. She's also very petite, almost small enough to, say, put in your pocket and sneak out of the studio before security stops you and you have to quickly come up with a clever explanation for stealing the film's diminutive and exquisite star.
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    AMERICANS FEAR MORE ABOUT WWIII THAN JAPANESE
    Americans are far more likely than the Japanese to expect another world war in their lifetime.
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    TELLY LEUNG OF "WICKED"
    Currently starring as Boq in the Chicago production of Wicked, Telly's Broadway credits include Flower Drum Song, and Pacific Overtures (on which he also appears on the cast recording). Outside of New York, he's appeared as Simon in Jesus Christ Superstar (Music Circus), Thuy in Miss Saigon (PCLO), Lun Tha in The King and I (starring Lou Diamond Phillips), and Dolph in But, I'm a Cheerleader!
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    DAI SIJIE'S "MR. MUO'S TRAVELING COUCH"
    Dai Sijie's endearing Mr. Muo in "Mr. Muo's Travelling Couch" has just returned from France, where he trained as a psychoanalyst. His goal is to be the first psychoanalyst in China. But first he has to find a virgin. Now the worldwide success of his first novel, "Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress," has put his movie career back on track.
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    IMMIGRANTS' USAGE OF HEALTHCARE
    Immigrants are not swamping the U.S. health care system and use it far less than native-born Americans, according to a American Journal of Public Health study. Immigrants accounted for 10.4 percent of the U.S. population but only 7.9 percent of total health spending and 8 percent of government health spending. Health spending by the government, insurers and patients themselves averaged $1,139 per immigrant compared to $2,564 for non-immigrants.
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    JUN ICHIKAWA'S "TONY TAKITANI"
    "Tony Takitani" is a sad song of loneliness from the start. Both highly specific and somehow universal in its conjuring of melancholy, Jun Ichikawa's film traces the title character's fundamental separateness as sprung forth and emblematized by his name.
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    JAY CHOU WANTS TO BE JET LI OF MUSIC
    Asian pop sensation Jay Chou admires Eminem, Jay-Z and Usher and hopes to break into Western markets. His strategy: "I want to become the Jet Li of music." He's branching out into acting, too, making his feature film debut in "Initial D," a Hong Kong production based on a Japanese cartoon series about street car racing. He says that action film star Li is his model because he used a Chinese art to attain success in the West.
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    NICOLE KIDMAN IN "LADY IN SHANGHAI"
    Wong Kar-wai plans to put Kidman in his new production Lady from Shanghai. Kidman did not request to see the screenplay, which fully reflected her trust in Wong and has already prepared to adapt to Wong's trademark directing style, which focuses less on script and more on on-spot shooting. The story is inspired by a lady in danger and mixes love with espionage. The movie will be produced in Shanghai but features an international cast.
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    HAYAO MIYAZAKI HONORED IN VENICE
    Every year, the Venice Film Festival honors a film career, and this edition's prize will go to Hayao Miyazaki, a Japanese animation master who has been called "the Japanese Disney."
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    CHARLIE CHAN'S SCRIPTWRITER - DAN MCDERMOTT
    With Lucy Liu attached to star, 20th Century Fox has turned to executive-turned-scribe Dan McDermott to pen the script for an updated version of Charlie Chan. In addition, Jennifer Klein and her Apartment 3B Prods. have joined the project in a producing capacity. Liu will executive produce.
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    AMERICAN'S INTEREST TO LEARN MANDARIN
    China is casting such a huge shadow on the United States that many Americans are scrambling to learn the Chinese language in a bid to retain their competitive edge. "Interest in learning Chinese among American youth and their parents has grown dramatically in the past five years," said Vivien Stewart, vice president at the Asia Society, a US group trying to bridge the gap between Americans and the peoples of Asia and the Pacific.
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    DON'T WORRY ABOUT CHINA, LEARN FROM IT
    Suppose that China becomes a larger economic power than the United States. Suppose, in our great-great-grandchildren's day, that the average Chinese citizen is about as rich as the average American. How would it hurt us? Why would we be worse off? If the Chinese were richer, they could buy more from us and employ more of our workers. They could buy more of our stocks. They could tour our beautiful nation more. The fact that our neighbors are worse off does not make us richer, and the fact that they are better off does not make us poorer.
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    Daniel Dae Kim in Charmed  
    Daniel Dae Kim  

    THERE IS MUCH MORE to Daniel Dae Kim than his good looks and charm. This up and coming actor has talents ranging from the stage to the big screen, from teaching to directing, from Science Fiction to Shakespeare.

     
     

    If all producers hear is a lot of criticism, it may actually deter some of them from taking chances at all. Do you know a producer once told me that some of his colleagues shy away from hiring ethnicities because they believe it’s a minefield? - that hiring ethnicities brings a set of concerns that they just don’t want to be bothered with. That’s why I think it is important that once we get those jobs that we make an effort to expand the notions of what’s possible for characters of color.

    In my opinion, Hollywood is not outright racist; the only color that really matters isn’t yellow, black, brown or white –it’s green. The majority of people in power aren’t out to “oppress” any particular group or gender; they do whatever they think will make them the most money, pure and simple. And right now, the common thinking is that Asian Americans don’t do that.

    I think the next step is to start creating fully developed Asian American characters, like Sandra Oh's on “Grey's Anatomy.” Hers is a fully fleshed out, compelling character, and she’s Asian American, without apology.

    . For me, its important to be given license to play as many different types of characters as possible, because that’s part of what it means to be an actor. By only wanting to play good guys or heroes, actors can sometimes hurt themselves in terms of career longevity.
    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    THE YEAR 2001 (updates on Daniel's career - ABC's "Lost" - can be found at his website and in a recent interview listed HERE.) was a busy one for Korean American actor Daniel Dae Kim. In the last half year alone, he had guest appearances on TV in Charmed and CSI, landed a recurring role as an evil lawyer on the popular WB series Angel (see box), and has just finished shooting a movie called Sin with Gary Oldman and Ving Rhames. Not bad at all for someone who had taken the previous year out to do a job in the business world.

    WHEN AS A YOUNG ADULT, Daniel decided to pursue acting, his parents were initially less than thrilled. When I asked if he could give any advice to young people who want to pursue a career that their parents don’t agree with, Daniel’s answer was, "Communicate. Relationships with parents are fragile, precious things, and I can't imagine my life without their support. I also think that ultimately what every parent wants is for their children to be happy, so if the child's choice is truly well thought out, sometimes just communicating that in an honest way that can serve as a beginning to a resolution. I don't want to preach, though. It's a very tricky issue - I know from experience!

    IT MUST HAVE BEEN especially difficult for Daniel, since even though he’d chosen Theatre as his second major at Haverford College/Bryn Mawr College, he hadn’t really considered an acting career: "At the time I didn't think I absolutely had to be an actor. When I was actually faced with offers from investment banks and law firms though, I knew it didn't feel right. Looking back at it now, I still think it was the right choice - and I know I would have regretted not choosing acting had I gone into one of those other disciplines. On the other hand, life is long. Who knows where any of us will be in ten years, right?

    HIS GROWING FAN BASE surely hopes that "DDK’s" career will continue to prosper. But if things go according to Kim’s wishes, that career may not be in acting alone. In spring 2001, he ran a workshop on acting in Shakespeare, and subsequently directed a production of Hamlet in Los Angeles. Daniel was able to draw on his extensive theatre experience, both as actor and director. "I love teaching, and I love directing for the stage. It's exhilarating. Somehow I find that I have much more energy as a director than as an actor. It's definitely something I hope to continue."

    SO IF A GOOD FAIRY offered him a free choice and guaranteed life-long success at whatever he chose, would Daniel prefer to act, direct, or teach, or all of the above? "Ahhh, if only... Actually, I would choose all of the above, and since we're fantasizing here, I'd also ask the fairy to help me be a success as a son, a father, a brother, a husband, and a friend as well."

    Click Here to Read More>>>>>

    Short "DDK" Biography

    Daniel Dae Kim
    Daniel Dae Kim

    Excerpt of a detailed biography at http://www.danieldaekim.org

    Daniel Dae Kim was born in Pusan, Korea. His family immigrated to the US when he was two years old, and he grew up in Pennsylvania.

    He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from Haverford College/Bryn Mawr College in Theatre & Political Science, and spent a semester studying at the National Theatre Institute at the Eugene O'Neill Theater Center in Waterford, Connecticut during junior year.

    In 1993, Daniel started the MFA acting program at NYU's Tisch School of the Arts, and graduated with a Masters in Acting in 96. While in New York, he performed in original comedies that he co-wrote and performed in while part of an improv group.

    After moving to Los Angeles in 1997, he immediately began finding work in television and film, appearing in over twenty projects in two years.

    Some of his idols are Paul Scofield, Gene Hackman, Robert DeNiro, Jonathan Pryce, Sidney Poitier, Gene Kelly, Denzel Washington, and Robert Duvall. He loves sports, including tennis, football, skiing and Tae Kwon Do.

    Daniel is married and has one son.

     

     

     
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